Travel Gear We Use: Best rain boots for kids and adults

Will Spring Break travel take you somewhere a little soggy? Do you have a road trip or camping trip planned in a rainy climate? Maybe you simply live, as we do, in the Pacific Northwest! Either way, you’re probably outfitting your family in rain boots this spring, and we’ve rounded up the best ones for travel days, camping trips, and all those days in-between.

Best rain boots for spring travel: we break it down!

 

Best rain boots for kids:

  • Kamik Stomp: When you buy boots, it’s nice when they can be passed down to a little brother or sister or two, and the quality of Kamik boots allow you to do just that. They’re also lightweight, no-nonsense, and cute. The Stomp fits feet sized 1-6, comes in classic colors, and retails for only $30. Our kid’s Stomps have been to the Olympic rainforest, Vancouver Island, and our own backyard. They’re light enough to toss into the back of the mini-van (along with everyone else’s boots) for a road trip into the outdoors, but sturdy enough to tromp through muddy hiking trails.
  • Muck Hale: If you need a boot that can go from snow to rain to mud to, well, muck, the Muck Hale is the one and only. We love this boot (which comes in adult sizes, too). It’s got a waterproof, rubberized bottom, and a fully insulated with 4mm NEOPRENE top. This means it’s easy to get the boot on and off (thank goodness!) and flexible enough to allow kids to snowshoe in them. My kid uses his as his after-ski boot in the snow, but also wears them to school for muddy outdoor play. The Hale is $69.99, but you get three season use out of them. Our favorite part: in addition to solid colors and patterns, the Hale comes in My Little Pony and Transformers designs…good to know if you have a fan.

Our midwest contributor had her young kids test out the Hasbro Hales. Here’s what she has to say: What kid wouldn’t like Optimus Prime or Rainbow Dash footwear? The Hale boots are made of a foamy material that is soft inside and out, but still feels durable enough to hold up to use by more than one child. My seven-year-old had a fabulous time tromping through the rocky, very cold creek in November with his Cub Scout den. If you put an extra pair of socks on the kids, the boots will do double duty as snow boots, providing the temperatures aren’t too cold. We used them that way, too, although I wouldn’t guarantee them for deep drifts and very cold temperatures.

The Hasbro boots come in two styles. We tried Hale ($69.99), but for thirty dollars more, you can also get the character boots designed for more extreme winter weather (Rugged II).

Best rain boots for women and women:

  • Muck Breezy for women: If you’re packing an entire carload of stuff, you don’t need bulky rain boots added to the mix. The Muck Breezy angle-height boot comes in super cute patterns and colors but only comes to 7″ height. I love that they’re totally waterproof and easy to walk in; I’ve walked all over Vancouver in mine, during a trip in which I needed to pack light. The Breezy is on sale and under $70 right now! Don’t forget, the Hale comes in women’s sizing, too. Pick it up for yourself!
  • Xtratuf Legacy and Elite: If you’ve visited Alaska, you’ve seen Xtratuf boots. These classic brown and yellow rubber boots seem to be everywhere in Southeast. The women’s Legacy is 15″ high, so you have great coverage to your knee, but can also fold down to reveal a very pretty inner lining pattern. So you get the classic look with a pop of color. The men’s version of the Legacy also folds down or up, and the men’s Elite adds insulation. Xtratuf boots live up to their name and can be found for under $150.

Spring family travel tip: Place the entire family’s rain boots in a travel laundry bag, and store the bag in the back of the car on road trips. Everyone’s boots will be easy to access when you stop, and the car will stay clean after they’re worn.

 

 

About the author

Pit Stops for Kids AUTHOR: Amy Whitley is the founding editor of Pit Stops for Kids and content editor of Trekaroo. She writes on staff monthly at a number of travel publications, and contributes to OutdoorsNW magazine as an outdoor adventure traveler. Find Amy at Google.

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  1. Fantastic post I like it. Keep it up

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